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Category Archives: Security

Intro to Qubes OS – a reasonably secure operating system

This is just to put it on your radar, I haven’t tried Qubes OS yet, but plan to.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

FOX NEWS REPORTS: Russia-linked malware found on US electric company’s laptop

 

I received a notification from US-CERT regarding GRIZZLY STEPPE two days ago, prior to the release of the Fox News story.  See this PDF to find out more about GRIZZLY STEPPE and APT’s like this one work (ATP: Advanced Persistent Threat).  https://www.us-cert.gov/sites/default/files/publications/JAR_16-20296A_GRIZZLY%20STEPPE-2016-1229.pdf

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

Blackberry DTEK50 – Deciding to Go Back to a Smartphone After 100+ Days Without One

Since moving to a dumbphone over 100 days ago, there have been few times that I have really missed having access to a smartphone.  The Nokia X3-02 has awesome sound quality, holds a great charge, and is so small that you hardly know you have it in your pocket.  However, there are some times when having a smartphone is critical to my job and the Nokia has to take a back seat when I am required to remotely reboot a system or solve some problem that falls outside of the boundaries of making a simple phone call or texting.

So, about three weeks ago I restarted my smartphone research.  Immediately in my research I was faced with a significant dilemma.  On one hand, there’s the iPhone.  Being somewhat secure (or at least some secure apps available) and receiving regular updates is highly desirable for anyone that works with technology and security.  Even though Apple seems to have stood up to the FBI with regard to unlocking an iPhone this past year, Apple has fallen incredibly short with its newest hardware and software releases.  In speaking directly with an Apple rep, it appears that I am not alone in my hardware and software concerns (comment if you want to know more).  Compounding Apple’s issues is a closed ecosystem, slow patches, and a high price point.  It looks more and more like the Apple I once loved has established its path in releasing sleek devices that are both underpowered and costly.

On the other hand, you have Android which represents a terribly splintered market.  Some devices on the cheap side hardly ever see updates.  Then you have “middle of the road” devices like the Moto G series, which may actually receive updates, but not necessarily in a timely manner.  Then you have higher end devices which will likely cost $600+ which will likely receive updates, but still not in as timely a manner as a security professional would prefer.

The top end of Android devices, like the Pixel, are sure to receive timely updates, but at a price point which rivals the cost of a decent laptop.  Personally, I can’t imagine dropping over $600 for a cell phone.

A Windows phone would be pretty inexpensive, would see timely updates, and includes a solid foundation for security (yes, I’m as surprised as you are that I am writing this… but research shows that the current Windows mobile platform is actually pretty good).  However, I was not going to go with a phone that has less compatibility.  The simple fact is that Windows phones have far fewer apps.

Blackberry… oh, how I long for the platform that brought me my first smartphone.  I once had an 8830 “world phone” by Blackberry and loved it.  It was so solid.  Then I think, “Oh, how RIM betrayed it’s users by using the same key on all consumer devices.”  Additionally, Blackberry’s BB10 OS is probably five years behind when it comes to available and compatible apps.

Yet, something striking now stands out from the company that betrayed its consumers.  Blackberry is realizing that they can offer multiple things that the splintered Android market cannot.  Security, timely updates, and a competitive price point.

With regard to security, I initially worried that the updates wouldn’t come as fast and often as the Google Pixel and other Android flagships, but a little research put my worries to reset.  I read over and over that Blackberry’s updates for their Android line of phones (including DTEK50/60, and Priv) often come faster than Google’s own updates for Nexus devices.  That is comforting news.

The most informative review I found was from Crackberry.com.  See here: http://crackberry.com/blackberry-dtek50-review.  That review has great pictures and really cuts to the heart of what Blackberry is trying to achieve with the release of this device.

Two weeks ago, I received a DTEK50 at just $229 (yes, that’s new) from B&H Photo.  I also ordered the smart cover.  Reviews were hard on the DTEK50 with regard to battery life.  I put that concern aside as I really couldn’t find any other viable options (sub $300).

In the last two weeks, I must say that I am quite impressed.  Battery life wasn’t nearly as bad as I worried.  Especially since I am a light user, I can get over a day out of the device no problem.  If you bury your head in your phone for hours on end, you will most likely have different results.

I’ll get to some of my thoughts in a follow up.  But for now, just know that I am very pleased with my decision to give Blackberry another shot.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

What do cyber attacks actually look like? Here… I’ll show you

Below are two denial of service attacks that have been caught in my honeypot recently (of the hundreds I’ve captured).  In each example, you see people people or systems unaware that they are in a virtual sandbox and can’t really execute live commands.  The first example is a someone pushing a script to my honeypot (you can tell because the commands are being pasted quickly).  The second is an actual person (you can tell due to misspellings of commands and the use of the backspace key).  Though a honeypot environment doesn’t actually permit the commands to run, these examples demonstrate how scripts are used to take control of systems and push DoS or DDoS attacks.

Example 1:

Example 2:

You may know that ePrepper.net has been under DoS/DDoS attack in the past.  WordPress is just about the best online blogging tool available, but it does fall under considerable attack due to the utilization of PHP code.  If you run a WordPress blog, here is my recommendation of plugin tools that will help keep attacks to a minimum:

  1. Wordfence Security
  2. Captcha by BestWebSoft
  3. IP Geo Block
  4. Simple IP Ban
  5. WP BackItUp
  6. WP Limit Login Attempts
  7. WP Statistics

Backup and patch often!

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

Are DDoS Attacks Being Scheduled?

Last week I noticed a spike of 15,000 hits.  This is probably a DDoS attack against some PHP code as WordPress is a huge target for such attacks.  As long as you keep systems patched, it usually isn’t an issue.  However, I find this follow up attack very interesting.  The hits match almost perfect (and could actually be the exact same hit count).

screen-shot-2016-12-05-at-5-55-32-pm

The second attack, exactly seven days after the original attack, may indicate that these DDoS attacks are following a schedule.

update:  More of the same today (12/05/2016)), except I’m at 25,000+ hits from a suspicious address (37.187.44.93):

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

Could This Be The World’s BEST CODEBOOK?

pocketnewtestamentOver a year ago I was asked by PrepperRecon to join in on an interview regarding secure email systems.  In the interview I gave an overview of email servers in Israel, Switzerland, and Norway.  One of my recent favorites is ProtonMail (Switzerland).  I love that you can send a secure email message and password that message so that the recipient must know the password in order to see the contents.  Of course, this raises the question, “How do I come up with a password method that I can share?”

This is a problem as old as espionage.  Even Israelites used a password in the Old Testament, when a word was used which was difficult for Israel’s enemies to pronounce.  The word was Shibboleth (see Judges 12 and wikipedia:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shibboleth).

Over the course of history, various methods have been developed to share passwords.  The most secure method of encryption is OTP (or One Time Pad) – see this link.  Basically, two one time pads are created.  Each one time pad can be used to send or receive a message.  In order to maintain security, each one time pad must be destroyed after use.  One time pads are typically only used for very short messages.  (Note: One time pads are still in use today.  Broadcasts can be heard over various frequencies saying things like, “alpha, alpha, juliet, bravo, etc., etc.”  Agents in the field can receive the messages using receivers which are pretty much undetectable, thereby maintaining good security).

One time pads come with a slew of problems.  Creating messages can be time consuming.  If a one time pad booklet is lost, there is no way to recreate it.  Messages are short, so you are limited by what you can communicate with a limited amount of characters.  The one time pad booklets would need replacing when they run out, which means contact might need to be reestablished anyways (and that could breach security).

What if instead of a one time pad you simply used a codebook?  The codebook would need to be small.  It would need to be common enough that it can be obtained easily by all team members.  It would also need enough pages to keep passwords fresh.  I think a pocket New Testament would be ideal.  Of course, everyone in your group would need to obtain the very same version so that all the letters fall in the same place on every page.

The problem remains about developing a password method that can be shared.  So, here are some ideas.

First, identify a page.  This could be done in a multitude of ways, but basic ways include:

  • simply giving a Book, chapter, and verse.
  • use a page number
  • reference a verse that others would know where to find (this also enforces the value of knowing scripture)

Second, coordinate a pattern.  The pattern will give you the code.  There are thousands, or millions, of patterns that could be used.  Here are some ideas:

  • the letter on the top right corner of every page over the next 20 pages
  • the third line from the bottom backwards for 20 characters (be sure to confirm whether or not spaces should be used)
  • use a column of letters down or up (like the right column of characters moving up from the bottom)
  • every other character of a specified line
  • use the page number to develop a pattern (like page 143, could be the first character, then skip four characters, then skip 3 characters).
  • keep it easy enough that you can remember and use it easy!

When using a system like ProtonMail, you may just need to put a verse, or page number, in the subject line.  As long as the person you communicate with has the code book and knows the proper pattern, then they can use the password to decrypt your message.

Never ever use the same page twice unless you are using a new and unique pattern.  But, the good news is that you never need to destroy your pages like a one time pad.  You simply need to communicate a new pattern.

Besides all this stuff about codebooks, having access to God’s Word is most important.  In the pages we find strength, encouragement, and salvation.  It’s just smart to have access to the Word anywhere you go.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

Does Your Phone/Laptop Have a KILL SWITCH? Probably.

Last week I finished reading Tiger Trap by David Wise.  The book was good, but I’m not going to delve into a full review here.  However, I will mention that I was a bit disappointed that the book only barely mentioned “kill switch” technology that the Chinese may be putting into technology.  If the Chinese possessed the ability to kill our tech, they would probably do it.

The Chinese aren’t the only ones we need worry about killing our tech.  We can look to our own government and industry for additional concerns.  Laptops and phones are being built in a nearly unrepairable manufacturing process.  When you purchase your tech now-a-days, you purchase devices that cannot even have batteries replaced without sending it to the factory.  More than likely, when even just a battery needs replacing, you will receive a replacement device instead of actually having your phone repaired.

Devices are becoming more expensive, yet unrepairable.  Does that even make sense?  Security is even being built in using the “throw away” mentality as well.  Government has the ability, in many cases, to disable a cell phone (PoliceOne article here).  We simply value data security more than the device itself, which is logical.

That’s all fine and good, right?  I mean, we all know that no one else could possibly figure out how to kill your cell phone.  Well, that’s not really true.  Past experience tells us that building things like this into technology come back to bite us when the hackers figure them out.  Figuring out challenges like “killing” someone’s phone is part of the hacker’s playground.  Such a project could even be funded by state actors.

It would make much more sense to me that we would make better attempts at securing our data rather than just relying on a chip to do it for us, but people want everything easy.  Thus, we have chips that can make our phones and laptops inoperable.

Does your device have a KILL SWITCH?

Intel Processors?  Probably – Starting with Sandy Bridge in 2010 processors can be disabled using 3G cellular network even if the laptop isn’t powered.

AMD Processor?  Inconclusive – Could not find information verifying whether or not AMD uses kill switch technology.  It looks like they are not using it.

Apple iPhone?  Yes – Beginning in iOS 8.

Google Phones?  At least some, Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 does, but you have to check your specific model

One question you may be asking right now is “What can I do about this?”  Probably nothing.  It is part of the way the world thinks about security right now.  If you don’t need a powerhouse of a computer, then maybe you will think about researching AMD processors and pick one of those in your next laptop.  As for smartphones, you are pretty much stuck.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

Is Tor Still Safe?

duckduckgo-is-tor-still-safeJust moments ago, I searched for the phrase “2016 is Tor still safe” on the anonymous search engine Duck Duck Go and I got the results in this screenshot (link to search here).  What was remarkable to me about the search is that the first 10+ links were all from articles more than a year old.  The average article was more than two years old.

So, this begs the question, “is Tor still valid in 2016?”  Additionally, this makes me question whether or not TailsOS still meets its promises of web surfing anonymity.

Tor has not gone without significant woes in 2016.  On May 25th of this year, Jacob Applebaum quit Tor “amid ‘sex misconduct’ accusations” according to The Register (link to source here).  Though Applebaum has been a significant voice for Tor advocates, he wasn’t the only bad news for web anonymity.  Further piling on problems is the fact that Lucky Green left in July, later pulling the plugs at the end of August of this year on his Tor nodes (link to Dark Web News source here).  In their article, “Dark Web News” refers to this as “matter of great concern.”

The Dark Web News article further points a response from Tor by “Appoint[ing] a new board of directors” (link to source here).  As you think about any company that has undergone a major board changeover, you think either one of two things will happen.  Either, the new board will drive the project/company into the ground, or the change will mean positive changes will occur.  Hardly ever do things just continue at the status quo.

Have things gotten better or worse for Tor?  I would have to emphatically say that they have improved and improved greatly!  Here are some observations:

  1. The Tor Project seems to have undergone a major website revamp in recent months which now clearly shows the connections between the Tor and community projects
  2. Improvements are being made on the messaging front by way of a Tor messenger (still in Beta)
  3. Involvement in Tor projects seems to be easier than ever with an incredible list of project ideas and promoting of volunteerism (which I think is critical to keeping a project like this moving ahead)
  4. Links to Tails and Copperhead (and other open source projects) pepper the website

Of course, not all these positives can likely be attributed to the board alone, but these are welcome changes.  It is great to see up to date information on their website.

Is TailsOS moving in the right direction as well?  Though tails.boum.org hasn’t undergone any major revamp of the website, there has been significant improvements.  In particular, there is much better information about how to build your own TailsOS bootable USB.  The project also continues to take security holes very seriously and the most recent update is marked 11/15/2016.  This continues to keep me very positive.

Many of you have noticed that we have pulled our inventory of TailsOS in the past few months.  There are mixed reasons for this.  First of all, the updates for TailsOS comes fast and it is important to me to always ship the latest version.  Sometimes that is hard to do.  Second, with concerns about Tor’s sustainability, I wanted to make sure that I was shipping a product that would continue to hold value.  With the recent research regarding Tor, TailsOS, and Copperhead, I am considering re-offering TailsOS bootable USB drives.  In addition, I am currently researching whether or not I can even provide phones loaded with Copperhead OS.  Please stay tuned!

If you are one of those that have been waiting for a TailsOS to reappear in our online store, please feel free to comment below, your comments will be kept private unless you request otherwise.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

Email Privacy and How Proton Mail Works:

Proton Mail uses an interesting method to help encrypt traffic from sender to recipient without compromising private keys.  Andy Yen explains how this works in this year-old video.  Proton Mail has a free version (no ads!).  Though I’m still playing around with Proton, it could very likely be my “go to” for email security because it is easy to use.

Email encryption can be complicated.  Sharing keys, etc, can be a nightmare and transporting keys over the web isn’t really the best way to share.  I hope that Proton’s fresh approach can make it into other venues, like social media, though I imagine there will be a lot of push back in that arena.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

You Don’t NEED a Smart Phone – avoid the lies from Apple, Google, and Microsoft

photo-on-10-1-16-at-10-11-amOk, I’m at 30 days in with a little Nokia X3.  I sold my iPhone 5S and upgraded my life by simplifying my cellular use.  Is this really possible?  Can you go with a simple phone, be more free, pay less, and really be satisfied?  My answer is yes.

Before we really dig into this, I have to be clear.  I am not totally against smart phones.  There is a good chance that I will go back to one myself (but with some strict limitations I will talk about later).

In realization that I’m making a fairly bold claim by saying that Apple, Google, and Microsoft are lying to us, I’ll break down my understanding of the smart phone sales model before getting into my smart-phone-free experience.

Apple, Google, and Microsoft (combined) provide any of the following combinations:

  • sell hardware
  • sell or market software
  • make money from ads and/or ad networks
  • sell internet bandwidth to consumers
  • sell their consumers an ecosystem of devices
  • market security services to consumers
  • market their own video conferencing
  • own other smaller companies that produce any of the above services

(These are just the first things I thought of and the list could be much longer.)

So, you buy a smart phone.  Initially for me, I purchased a smart phone because I wanted communication security for an organization I was doing work with.  The phone I purchased was a Blackberry and, as we now know, the security model I bought into was a complete illusion (Blackberry is now known for using the same key on all consumer devices and holding a “master key” which would give them the ability to unlock any content they wanted).

Perhaps you justified the need when you originally purchased a smart phone, but then, you build a dependency.  This dependency is what every manufacturer strives for as it builds a reliance for the consumer to keep consuming goods and services from the vendor.  For me, I purchased a communications device, then I got sucked into the apps that were available, and over time (years for me) I became distracted more and more by the device.  The device became an animal that justified it’s own need.  It was an obsession.  For me, it became about having it, being distracted by it, looking at it when I was in a boring meeting, pulling it out of my pocket when I was in a line… but why?

It doesn’t make sense.  But does it?  I am addicted to information.  Interestingly enough, there’s already a couple terms dubbed for this:

  • infoholic: someone with an insatiable desire for information
  • dataholic: someone that uses the internet unnecessarily

There’s a great similarity between alcoholism and infoholism (I’m not sure if “infoholism” has been dubbed yet, so I may be the first).  The drink makes you desire more and the information makes you desire more.  The fact is, you can’t know everything.  I would argue that you weren’t designed by God to know everything and that information easily becomes a distraction to God’s will for us… but maybe that’s a future post.

So, we consume the information and really the information consumes us as well.  We Google, Bing, and DuckDuckGo.  We Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.  We game, we waste time, and consume, consume consume.  We are gorgers of the internet feast.  We live in a digital world, forgetting our physical links to physical people, text instead of talk and post instead of touch.  We look and read instead of tasting the life that God has right in front of us.

We have senses for a reason: taste, touch, smell, sight, and hearing.  We can only use two of these effectively with a smart phone.  We can see and hear.  Yes, we can touch, but it is a faked-out version of touch and limits to a screen.  Real life experience is so much more than a screen.  Really, even sight is faked-out since it is a two dimensional screen.  I know 3D research is making huge improvements, but still it just mimics what God already created.

So, when I say Apple, Google, and Microsoft are lying to us.  It is that they are selling us a cheapened version of life.  They are moving more and more stuff into the digital realm and we are falling for it and paying for it hand over fist.

But, not only are these big three manipulating how we make decisions, almost every cellular dealer has bought into this as well.  At most cellular companies you might have the option for, at most, 2 or 3 simple phones.  They sell you a smart phone, then capitalize on the data usage.  Data usage grows year over year and you eventually feel it in your wallet.  At first, when you buy the phone, you are thinking, “gimme gimme gimme, I need, I need” (much like the character Bob in the movie “What About Bob?”).  Then, the device just seems to take over.  The business model for cellular companies is that you need a smart phone and you will receive cross looks if you go to get a simple feature phone.  Of course, Ting is the exception here due to their open model allowing a user to bring any compatible phone to their network.

Ok, now to my own experience in the last 30 days.

  1. More productivity.  It wasn’t getting rid of the phone alone that removed distraction and helped me focus, I also changed to a standing desk in my office and that has also been a great improvement.
  2. Reclaimed spare time.  Yeah, I still get bored when in a line or in a boring meeting.  However, I have time to think.  If I get my computer out, it is specifically because I need to search something and not just because I have a device in my pocket.  So, I don’t mindlessly waste time.  I guess you might say that if I waste time now it is more intentional.
  3. More observant.  Because I have less distraction in my pocket, I tend to see more of what is going on around me.  I try to say “hello” to more people (even if their heads are buried in phones).  Overall, I find myself examining my surroundings more.
  4. Battery life.  I’ve gone from charging every night to charging every couple days (even though the battery is really only 50-75% depleted).  I could probably go for 4 days easy or three days if I’m using the audio player for a few hours.
  5. Higher Attention to People.  When people try to reach me, they know they’ve got me.  There isn’t the illusion of texting when a person may or may not be really paying attention to you.  When you reach me on the phone, you know that you are talking to me.  You know that I am engaging in conversation.  Vocal inflections are lost in text, but hard to fake when you are listening to somebody speak.

One of my biggest challenges was music and audiobooks.  I love both of these.  Music wasn’t too much of a challenge as I just picked up a 16GB card, put it in my phone and transferred my music library over to the card.  Audiobooks were a huge challenge.  However, I was finally able to get my audiobooks using a program called AAX-to-MP3.  Then, I had to get an app for the Symbian S40 from a guy online (the app bookmarks your last listening location and is designed specifically for the Symbian S40).  I had to compile a program on linux, download and convert my Audible AAX files, then get the app working on the phone, but after a few hours of mucking around, I finally got it all to work.  The Nokia X3-02 has phenomenal audio quality and I would HIGHLY recommend this phone over any phone I’ve ever heard (smart phones included).

What’s the downside?  Well, I still have lots of friends that use iMessage.  Really, any sort of texting on my little phone is annoying.  But, it does keep my texts shorter and reduce cost.  Also, there are times that looking something up on my phone or taking a quality picture would be nice, but I guess I’ve lived without these features for a month and it really isn’t a big deal.

Will I go back to a smart phone?  Maybe.  But, I know I really need to limit some things.  Now that I know I can make it on a small phone, I will likely get another GSM phone so I can just swap sims when I feel like I need to use a smart phone.  Also, I will likely limit all my messaging to “signal” messenger to maintain some security.  Now that all my friends think I’ve forgotten about them, making the switch to signal will be an improvement!  I would also likely choose Copperhead OS to make sure I am getting the latest patches.  But, really, I’m on the fence.  I don’t feel like I need a smart phone and maybe just having access to a tablet for occasional portable use would be plenty.  For that matter, where can I take a tablet that I can’t take a laptop?  Really, I am trying to keep myself in check.

What’s also interesting are the comments I’ve heard.  I’ve heard people say…

  • Wow, I really commend you.
  • That’s a brave move.
  • WHAT is that? (gives me a chance to explain what I’m doing and why)

As an IT Professional without a smart phone, you bet I get glances from my peers.  But, I don’t care.  I’m more care-free and it is great not being tethered to information or let other people keep their thumbs on you with unnecessary text messages and distractions.

Of course, I’d be amiss if I didn’t mention Ting.  Yeah, yeah, I know, you are saying, “What!?  Now you are going to hit your readers with a commercial?!”  The fact is, I could have made this switch happen without a company that gives me control over changing my devices, porting my number around, and has both CDMA and GSM access.  Thank you TING!  I love you guys and am proud to be a Ting Agent.  So, if you are looking to pick up a cheap GSM chip that you can throw into a device and try their care-free service, you can click the link below.  Maybe you are even in the market to change phones, they can help you there too.  Even if you are sticking with a smart phone, you can just purchase a SIM at $9, you get a $25 service credit (which on a little cheap phone like mine could get you through a couple months of service!).

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ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.