Internet Storm Center Infocon Status

Is Tor Still Safe?

duckduckgo-is-tor-still-safeJust moments ago, I searched for the phrase “2016 is Tor still safe” on the anonymous search engine Duck Duck Go and I got the results in this screenshot (link to search here).  What was remarkable to me about the search is that the first 10+ links were all from articles more than a year old.  The average article was more than two years old.

So, this begs the question, “is Tor still valid in 2016?”  Additionally, this makes me question whether or not TailsOS still meets its promises of web surfing anonymity.

Tor has not gone without significant woes in 2016.  On May 25th of this year, Jacob Applebaum quit Tor “amid ‘sex misconduct’ accusations” according to The Register (link to source here).  Though Applebaum has been a significant voice for Tor advocates, he wasn’t the only bad news for web anonymity.  Further piling on problems is the fact that Lucky Green left in July, later pulling the plugs at the end of August of this year on his Tor nodes (link to Dark Web News source here).  In their article, “Dark Web News” refers to this as “matter of great concern.”

The Dark Web News article further points a response from Tor by “Appoint[ing] a new board of directors” (link to source here).  As you think about any company that has undergone a major board changeover, you think either one of two things will happen.  Either, the new board will drive the project/company into the ground, or the change will mean positive changes will occur.  Hardly ever do things just continue at the status quo.

Have things gotten better or worse for Tor?  I would have to emphatically say that they have improved and improved greatly!  Here are some observations:

  1. The Tor Project seems to have undergone a major website revamp in recent months which now clearly shows the connections between the Tor and community projects
  2. Improvements are being made on the messaging front by way of a Tor messenger (still in Beta)
  3. Involvement in Tor projects seems to be easier than ever with an incredible list of project ideas and promoting of volunteerism (which I think is critical to keeping a project like this moving ahead)
  4. Links to Tails and Copperhead (and other open source projects) pepper the website

Of course, not all these positives can likely be attributed to the board alone, but these are welcome changes.  It is great to see up to date information on their website.

Is TailsOS moving in the right direction as well?  Though tails.boum.org hasn’t undergone any major revamp of the website, there has been significant improvements.  In particular, there is much better information about how to build your own TailsOS bootable USB.  The project also continues to take security holes very seriously and the most recent update is marked 11/15/2016.  This continues to keep me very positive.

Many of you have noticed that we have pulled our inventory of TailsOS in the past few months.  There are mixed reasons for this.  First of all, the updates for TailsOS comes fast and it is important to me to always ship the latest version.  Sometimes that is hard to do.  Second, with concerns about Tor’s sustainability, I wanted to make sure that I was shipping a product that would continue to hold value.  With the recent research regarding Tor, TailsOS, and Copperhead, I am considering re-offering TailsOS bootable USB drives.  In addition, I am currently researching whether or not I can even provide phones loaded with Copperhead OS.  Please stay tuned!

If you are one of those that have been waiting for a TailsOS to reappear in our online store, please feel free to comment below, your comments will be kept private unless you request otherwise.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

5 Things that Freedom of Speech is Not

american flag

5 Things that Freedom of Speech is NOT…

1 – receiving a payment so you will be motivated to become involved in a protest

2 – spraying your message in the form of graffiti

3 – violent

4 – an excuse for unlawful behavior

5 – a means to protest the US Constitution (which enables your freedom)

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

Where are You on the Violent Crime Map?

This is just food for thought.  When things get bad, consider this map and how things will get worse in a disastrous scenario.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

Pixie CW (Morse Code) Kit – Video from Youtube

I need to pick up a couple of these kits, and found this video to be of much better quality than others I’ve seen so I thought I would pass it along.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

Ham Radio and the Prepper – the good and bad of ham radio operation

Here’s a little history… Though interested in ham radio for much of my life, it wasn’t until 2005 that my interest really piqued.  It was through helping a small community get connected to the intenet where I met Stan.  Stan, now a “silent key” (a term used to refer to those hams that have passed on), had gear lying all over the place.  At an age of 80-plus Stan had an intentness about him and a eagerness to learn new things.

Stan and his wife Mary had three phones lines.  They each had their own voice line as well as a modem line since both liked to stay connected online with email and such.  The broadband at the time was only 3Mbits, but was a welcome change from 56Kbit dialup (which often connected lower than 40Kbit).

Stan and his wife were full of stories.  Stan in particular talked much about his time in the merchant marines and various projects he worked on for a government agency, of which I will not mention since both he and his wife worked for this agency.

In one story, Stan told me about how he was the radio operator on a ship.  Stan told a fellow technician that he could hammer out a SOS even if the ship’s radios were down simply by using an ohmmeter and the ships existing antenna.  Word got to the captain who insisted Stan give him a demonstration.  Stan intially refused saying that sending an SOS would not be a wise idea, however, the captain continued to insist and said that it was impossible.  Stan sent a brief SOS and an audible response to the SOS could clearly be heard from the captain’s radio.  Stan told me he quickly disconnected from the antenna and was worried about reprocussions (which never happened), but Stan won his bet with the captain!

Stan had gear all over the place, ham transceivers, large amplifiers, antennas, homebrew projects, and he was showing a fascination with SDR (software defined radio, which was in its infancy).

With some encouragement from Stan, I tested into a General Class ham license and Stan helped me get set up with my first SDR rig (a SDR-1000 by Flex Radio).  Once I had the rig, I had to get it online, which meant setting up an antenna.  So, I built a 135 foot OCF (off-center-fed) dipole with legs of 90 and 45 feet.  My first contact on the radio was a voice contact using SSB on 20 meters over 1,000 miles away on just 1 watt of power.  I was blown away!  Of course, much of that success had to do with Stan investing some time and energy into helping me understand low power and antennas.

So what does all this have to do with prepping?  Ham radio operation can be a great addition to any prepper’s toolbox (given that one goes through the process of acquiring a ham radio license).  But, one of the biggest problems with ham radio communication is that it cannot legally be secured.

Every transmission must be able to be read.  It is read using readily available standards like SSB, CW (morse code), RTTY, packet data, AM, FM, etc.  The ability of fellow hams and the FCC to read any given transmission is a legal boundary of accepting a ham radio operator’s license.  Encryption cannot be used.  Speaking in code is a violation of the license.  Additionally, focusing conversation on political or controversial issues is a “no no.”  The purpose of ham radio isn’t to protect one’s freedom of speech and it is to provide a playground for like-minded techies to discover radio technology and learn.  The good is that ham radio does that last part very well, it does provide an excellent learning playground.

Adding more good onto this is that ham radio bands open up in the event of an emergency.  But, that doesn’t mean anyone with a radio should use it (with or without a license).  In fact, the morons out there that have radios and don’t have licenses will probably have very little understanding about how to conduct proper radio communications in an emergency because they have no experience.  They’ve bought radios, check their charge every once in a while, maybe turn them on and listen in a little, then turn them back off and put them in storage.

Aggravating the emergency situation will be the multitudes of ham wanna-bees that have bought the crazy cheap Baofeng radios.  Note:  I’m not saying there is anything wrong with the Baofeng UV-5R or other Baofeng radio, I’m just saying it is like getting a really cheap gun and hoping it works well when you need it.  In a disaster, the airwaves could get flooded with traffic from people who don’t know what frequencies they should or shouldn’t be operating on and potentially disrupt police, emergency services, paging and other systems.

But, more good is the fact that since there are ham radio standards like SSB, CW, and RTTY, one can easily, and with a minimum amount of gear, start tuning in.  In fact, I think this is the most ideal way to use ham radio is simply by listening.  One can gather information without shining a spotlight on their own location.  When you tune in your TV on local stations, you bypass online streaming, your are not logged, you simply receive what is already available.  It can be discreet.  But, when you go online, your traffic is logged, Roku/Netflix/Amazon know exactly what you are watching or listening to.

Going beyond ham, listening in on shortwave can provide one of the best spectrums of information.  Certainly there are garbage broadcasts out there, but there is also a wealth of news that is free for your listening pleasure.  Over-the-air transmissions are probably the worst with regard to security, but could be the best with regard to anonymity.  So, dig out that Beofeng and do some listening.  Tune your Tecsun in, get a good antenna, and see what kind of range you can receive.  Find your local repeaters on the 2-meter Baofeng and just tune in.  Of course, if you have a license, then join the local banter and learn more about your gear.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

Cell Phone Blu’s – Is your Blu phone sending data to China?

Rather than cover this myself, there are plenty of news articles out there already:

If you have time for just one article, be sure to click the top link.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

Wireless Dead Drop Using Raspberry Pi

It is very well known that a Raspberry Pi can easily be used as a weak FM transmitter.  An Instructable has been dedicated to the topic (http://www.instructables.com/id/Raspberry-Pi-Radio-Transmitter/?ALLSTEPS).  A slew of other articles for support, troubleshooting, and improving the project can be found easily in any search engine.

I got thinking about the whole USB dead drop thing (deaddrops.com).  It is fun to do geocaching and the USB dead drop thing is really the same idea.  Unfortunately, advertising sites makes them a target for vandalism and theft.  It kinda ruins the fun for everyone else.  In my area only 1 of the 3 USB dead drops has has been recently confirmed.  This led me to think about creating a drop that could be accessed wirelessly.

Using a wifi connection would certainly be possible, but it wouldn’t be the easiest thing in the world and would easily become a target for hacking.  I also got thinking about accessing information in the event that there really was a need for security.  For me, I spend a lot of time walking and running along some trails.  It really wouldn’t be that hard to create a device that transmits a message that could be heard over FM.  It would be easy for someone to be walking along while tuning in a frequency on an FM-enabled cell phone (or FM-enabled MP3 player) at a specified location and receive a message.

The Raspberry Pi radio project has a range of roughly 40 feet.  One solution to stealing and vandalism is simply not advertising the location to the public.  A project as being described here would maybe need to be solar powered and/or possibly engineered to only turn on during certain times.  One issue might be retrieving the Pi to update the message.

But, there are lots of other ways that the Pi could be used to transmit the message.  One could have a Pi that was transmitting a particular message and do an informational drive-by while the recipient was listening to the frequency (such as performing the transmission at a parking lot).  For that matter, two people with one Pi each could transmit on 2 different frequencies.  I’m sure there is an easy modification to even take the mic input of the Pi and hook up a microphone, and with the addition of headphones on the FM radio, a pair of people could talk discreetly being in proximity in their vehicles while at the same time not observed as talking to each other.

Who knows what information one might want to transmit.  It could be anything.  It could be a code word, instructions for a discreet meeting, or whatever.

The cool thing is that the Pi, being a computer, could make it easy to perform a text-to-speech broadcast thereby maintaining some anonymity.  Of course, all this is in theory, but I know full well that the individual pieces required to make this a reality already exist.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

A Simple Arduino Morse Code Beacon

Graphic from ebay auction
Graphic from ebay auction

A morse code beacon could easily be attached to a pixie CW board or similar small QRP transmitter/transceiver.  Ideally, one would want to create a beacon that did not interfere with other traffic and since a beacon typically repeats continually, here are some ideas… and maybe some code to get you started.

Though I don’t consider this post to outline everything need for a fully functioning project, my criteria for such a project would include…

  1. The ability to easily modify repeater text (via code in Arduino software is suitable for this)
  2. The ability to change speed easily (again, Arduino should be more than sufficient with the Arduino IDE)
  3. A transceiver project should have the ability not to step on anyone’s signals – meaning, if the frequency isn’t clear (for a determined time of something like 30 seconds) stop transmitting until it is clear (this could also be done easily by getting an output from the Pixie) – Yeah, I know that the Pixie is less than a watt, but out of respect to other locals that might try to use the frequency, it would be great if it backed off while others were transmitting on the same frequency.
  4. Use a small board that can easily be powered via solar or battery if desired (Arduino can do this and the Pixie also adheres to this requirement)

As I look at some people’s code on the web for CW (morse) converters for Arduino, I found some grossly inefficient code.  For example, one person had actually coded the delays for every character instead of creating a dictionary to handle it (effectively adding hundreds of lines of unnecessary code).  I figured if I was going to write code, I would create a dictionary with the dots and dashes, then use a line of code to convert them to a pinout to send to the Pixie.  It seems I was late to this thought as Matthias Esterl (known as ‘madc’ on github) beat me to the punch.  Madc’s code can be found here: https://gist.github.com/madc/4474559 (and is the code referenced below)

Picture from https://www.adafruit.com/products/50
Picture from https://www.adafruit.com/products/50

So, if you aren’t familiar with Arduino, you should pick up a board (they are super cheap and can sometimes be found under $20).  I would recommend the Uno R3 as pictured.  Though you can pick up a knock-off that is fully compatible and likely cheaper, the quality of the one pictured is pretty nice and it gives a lot of flexible options.  Once you know for sure that a project board has everything you need for success, then certainly opt for the cheaper board, but for experimentation, the R3 is a great board.

Ok, moving on to code and with respect to the author, the copyright is included in this post:

Copyright (c) 2015 Matthias Esterl
Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
of this software and associated documentation files (the “Software”), to deal
in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights
to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell
copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:
The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in
all copies or substantial portions of the Software.
THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED “AS IS”, WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

Ok, now the code… and it has been slightly modified by me.  In particular I changed the 2nd line of code to PIN_OUT 13 so that I could just see that it was working on the Arduino’s build-in LED light.  2nd, the CW was paced at a very slow pace, so I sped up UNIT_LENGTH by reducing the value from 250 to 100.  I’m not sure exactly where this falls with regard to words per minute, but it sped it up quite a bit.  Lastly, I changed the morse code text (the variable “morseWord”) to read more like a beacon’s output.

//Define the LED Pin
#define PIN_OUT 13
//Define unit length in ms
#define UNIT_LENGTH 100

//Build a struct with the morse code mapping
static const struct {const char letter, *code;} MorseMap[] =
{
{ ‘A’, “.-” },
{ ‘B’, “-…” },
{ ‘C’, “-.-.” },
{ ‘D’, “-..” },
{ ‘E’, “.” },
{ ‘F’, “..-.” },
{ ‘G’, “–.” },
{ ‘H’, “….” },
{ ‘I’, “..” },
{ ‘J’, “.—” },
{ ‘K’, “-.-” },
{ ‘L’, “.-..” },
{ ‘M’, “–” },
{ ‘N’, “-.” },
{ ‘O’, “—” },
{ ‘P’, “.–.” },
{ ‘Q’, “–.-” },
{ ‘R’, “.-.” },
{ ‘S’, “…” },
{ ‘T’, “-” },
{ ‘U’, “..-” },
{ ‘V’, “…-” },
{ ‘W’, “.–” },
{ ‘X’, “-..-” },
{ ‘Y’, “-.–” },
{ ‘Z’, “–..” },
{ ‘ ‘, ” ” }, //Gap between word, seven units

{ ‘1’, “.—-” },
{ ‘2’, “..—” },
{ ‘3’, “…–” },
{ ‘4’, “….-” },
{ ‘5’, “…..” },
{ ‘6’, “-….” },
{ ‘7’, “–…” },
{ ‘8’, “—..” },
{ ‘9’, “—-.” },
{ ‘0’, “—–” },

{ ‘.’, “·–·–·–” },
{ ‘,’, “–..–” },
{ ‘?’, “..–..” },
{ ‘!’, “-.-.–” },
{ ‘:’, “—…” },
{ ‘;’, “-.-.-.” },
{ ‘(‘, “-.–.” },
{ ‘)’, “-.–.-” },
{ ‘”‘, “.-..-.” },
{ ‘@’, “.–.-.” },
{ ‘&’, “.-…” },
};

void setup()
{
pinMode( PIN_OUT, OUTPUT );
digitalWrite( PIN_OUT, LOW );
}

void loop()
{
String morseWord = encode( “V V V CALLNAME/B QRPP BEACON E E E E E ” );

for(int i=0; i<=morseWord.length(); i++)
{
switch( morseWord[i] )
{
case ‘.’: //dit
digitalWrite( PIN_OUT, HIGH );
delay( UNIT_LENGTH );
digitalWrite( PIN_OUT, LOW );
delay( UNIT_LENGTH );

break;

case ‘-‘: //dah
digitalWrite( PIN_OUT, HIGH );
delay( UNIT_LENGTH*3 );
digitalWrite( PIN_OUT, LOW );
delay( UNIT_LENGTH );

break;

case ‘ ‘: //gap
delay( UNIT_LENGTH );
}
}
}

String encode(const char *string)
{
size_t i, j;
String morseWord = “”;

for( i = 0; string[i]; ++i )
{
for( j = 0; j < sizeof MorseMap / sizeof *MorseMap; ++j )
{
if( toupper(string[i]) == MorseMap[j].letter )
{
morseWord += MorseMap[j].code;
break;
}
}
morseWord += ” “; //Add tailing space to seperate the chars
}

return morseWord;
}

String decode(String morse)
{
String msg = “”;

int lastPos = 0;
int pos = morse.indexOf(‘ ‘);
while( lastPos <= morse.lastIndexOf(‘ ‘) )
{
for( int i = 0; i < sizeof MorseMap / sizeof *MorseMap; ++i )
{
if( morse.substring(lastPos, pos) == MorseMap[i].code )
{
msg += MorseMap[i].letter;
}
}

lastPos = pos+1;
pos = morse.indexOf(‘ ‘, lastPos);

// Handle white-spaces between words (7 spaces)
while( morse[lastPos] == ‘ ‘ && morse[pos+1] == ‘ ‘ )
{
pos ++;
}
}

return msg;
}

Some improvements I might make upon the code is improved spacing of characters.  It seem that when transmitting the letter “V” (…-), the last ‘.’ runs right into the ‘-‘ (though I’m not sure how it sounds, maybe it is fine).  (**NOTE: After writing this, I hooked up a speaker and it does in fact sound fine).  To make all this more functional, I would need a Pixie hooked up, figure out exactly make the PIN_OUT trigger the key-jack on the Pixie (act like a relay) and may have to build a small intermediary board (or use a breadboard) to better complete connections for testing.  In theory, all this should work without a hitch and there are successful Pixie beacon projects documents on the internet.

Finally, and I think the best modification for such a project, would be to use a couple pins coming from the Pixie and feed them back into the Arduino and add a variable that samples and averages the output form the Pixie to help determine if someone is transmitting on the frequency.  If the newly averaged variable is greater than a particular value, a delay is added to the loop and continue after an adequate average is lower than a particular value.

I would be interested to hear from anyone that is currently running any CW beacon to help identify the challenges of such a project.  Thank you Madc for you code and I look forward to messing around with it a bit more!

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

Should we be asking God for persecution? (Philippians 1)

Philippians is one of my favorite books of the New Testament.  It is a ‘thank you’ letter to a group of believers that Paul holds dear to his heart.  Even those that don’t make scripture memorization a priority will recognize some of Philippians many keystone verses like 4:13, “I can do all things through Christ which strengthens me,” 4:6, “Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God,” and 1:6, “Being confident of this, that he who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus.”

These scriptures could easily apply to persecution, but the point is not to cherry-pick some verses and see if they apply, but rather to focus on what Paul actually says about the subject of persecution.  We find that Paul’s message is quite clear.

Immediately following the opening of the letter (found in verses 1-11) Paul continues (v.12) by saying “Now I want you to know, brothers and sisters, that what has happened to me has actually served to advance the gospel.”  Paul appears to desire to remove doubt about his present condition.  In doing so, he also sends an underlying message in this verse.  That message is that persecution works to advance the gospel.

1:12-14 – Now I want you to know, brothers and sisters, that what has happened to me has actually served to advance the gospel. As a result, it has become clear throughout the whole palace guard and to everyone else that I am in chains for Christ. And because of my chains, most of the brothers and sisters have become confident in the Lord and dare all the more to proclaim the gospel without fear.

Our fear of persecution isn’t without merit.  I’m sure that most of what we fear is highly unknown to US-based, prosperity-driven, churches.  Paul gives an example as it is obvious that his persecution has made it clear to the whole “palace guard” that his bonds are for Christ.  Further, he points out that, for the most part, this has brought confidence to Paul and fellow believers.  I say “for the most part” since “most of the brothers and sisters have become confident” which may mean that some are fearful of Paul’s state or maybe worse.  Regardless, the persecuted life, as presented by Paul, is superior.

The last few verses of chapter one continue to reinforce Paul’s proposition.

1:27-30 – Whatever happens, conduct yourselves in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ. Then, whether I come and see you or only hear about you in my absence, I will know that you stand firm in the one Spirit, striving together as one for the faith of the gospel without being frightened in any way by those who oppose you. This is a sign to them that they will be destroyed, but that you will be saved—and that by God. For it has been granted to you on behalf of Christ not only to believe in him, but also to suffer for him, since you are going through the same struggle you saw I had, and now hear that I still have.

Verse 30 sticks out to me, “… not only to believe in him, but also to suffer for him…”  In a nation that is currently divided by election results, we see protestors taking to the streets.  Apparently, they are very passionate.  How passionate would someone say that I am about my stand with Christ?  How quickly am I to say something when I observe something I know is wrong?  Many of my actions are squelched because I have fear.  I fear what people will think of me.  I fear how it may affect my relationships or my own personal prosperity.  What I really want to do is to be able to proclaim the gospel without fear.  I think that it will take persecution for me to be pushed hard enough to really take the stand that Christ requires of me.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.

Email Privacy and How Proton Mail Works:

Proton Mail uses an interesting method to help encrypt traffic from sender to recipient without compromising private keys.  Andy Yen explains how this works in this year-old video.  Proton Mail has a free version (no ads!).  Though I’m still playing around with Proton, it could very likely be my “go to” for email security because it is easy to use.

Email encryption can be complicated.  Sharing keys, etc, can be a nightmare and transporting keys over the web isn’t really the best way to share.  I hope that Proton’s fresh approach can make it into other venues, like social media, though I imagine there will be a lot of push back in that arena.

ePrepper is going offline this month and will likely be offline before the end of January 2017, unless I can find someone to either take over the site or migrate its content to. Properly maintaining the site has been taking up too much time and cutting into my family. I would like to see the content of ePrepper get absorbed into a larger site. If you run a blog and are interested using content from ePrepper, please email dan [dot] michaels [at] eprepper [dot] net.